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On the Inside: Are STEM Fields Becoming More Inclusive?

Science, math, engineering, and technology fields are taking over the labor market — as there is an increased reliance on innovations in electronic materials, like LED encapsulants andsilicone encapsulants, there is a greater need for people who are trained, experienced, and capable in these fields, to further research and develop technology.

Historically, people involved in science, math, engineering, and technology fields have been male. Because of the need for more people in science, math, engineering, and technology fields, and the boost that diverse thinking can bring, there has been a call for more inclusivity, encouraging women, people of color, persons with disabilities, and other diverse populations to enter into science, math, engineering, and technology fields.

Overall, it would seem that science, math, engineering, and technology fields have responded to this call and there is a greater sense of inclusivity. Enrolment in post-secondary institutions that focus on science, math, engineering, and technology fields is target toward people whose viewpoints are currently lacking, and government programs along with educational opportunities and an increased amount of individualized support seems to be having a positive effect.

There is, of course, still a long way to go in bringing inclusivity to science, math, engineering, and technology fields. Educational facilities, companies, and governments and other organizations devoted to innovation in electronic materials must work together to make the STEM fields more enticing to people of all backgrounds.

Diversity and inclusivity in science, math, engineering, and technology fields can only be a good thing — an increased number of people involved in STEM has led to great strides in areas like LED encapsulants and silicone encapsulants, along with other electronic materials and technology. For STEM to keep going, and for technology to keep moving forward, a varied workforce is a must.

Long-term strategies like education and career advising for younger students who display an interest in science, math, engineering, and technology fields, role models and tutors who are visible in the community, and other concrete, carefully thought-out assistance for students, has already had an impact and should continue to improve the situation.

For those already in science, math, engineering, and technology fields, encouraging a diverse population of would-be employees can go a long way in ensuring the industry remains inclusive. All companies, schools, and organizations involved in STEM should take note.